6 Bad Answers to Job Interview Questions

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1. Why do you want the job?

– “I’ve read a lot about your company and I really think my skill-set could help out around here.”

This sounds very robotic and it doesn’t show any personality. Recruiters can know when you are being genuine and when you are trying to please them with a cliché. Be honest and focus on your skills, your goals and what the position/company has to offer you. Be specific.

 

2. Tell me about a time when you had a conflict with someone at work and how you resolved it.

– “I usually get along very well with everyone.”

It’s not true and it shows the recruiter that you probably don’t focus on your past experiences in order to improve. It’s true that there are some people that really get along with MOST people, but we all have experiences with people that are way too different from us. It doesn’t have to be a conflict but try to have a situation in mind to answer this question.

 

3. What do you think is your greatest weakness?

– “I’m an overachiever, and work long hours that leave me little time for anything else but serving the organization.”

Sometimes what we think the companies want to hear is exactly what keep us from getting that job. Don’t play this game, play safe. Prepare these answers before the interview and think of something that you can provide examples on how you are trying to improve your weaknesses.

 

4. What do you like to do in your spare time?

– “Going to the pub and sleeping”

Some companies ask this question to get to know more about the candidate. It’s not usually something that is going to take a big role in the decision but it’s more of an opportunity to create a human and genuine connection between the recruiter/company and the candidate. Take advantage of this question and smile, be funnier and show your social skills. Because here they are trying to get to know how you get along socially and break the ice.

 

5.  What do you expect to enjoy most about this role?

–  “Lunchtimes” – “Salary” – “Discounts” – “Holidays”

Show that you did your research and state the key aspects of the specific role that you are most excited about.

 

6. Where do you see yourself in five years?

– “I see myself doing your job”

Of course some companies will like this kind of answer but most will not. This kind of confidence works better in start-up companies. You can also use this same idea but use different words where you are not threatening the interviewer in any way. Be smart and be specific.

 

http://www.impressiveresumes.net

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How stupid and unreal do you find most job offers?

Perfection

Looking for an employee able to work in a team and work independently?

It is not unusual to find these kind of requirements in a job offer, but what is the real meaning behind them?

We were looking for some job offers and we found this one asking for someone to be able to work in a team environment and work independently. At first we didn’t pay much attention because we are so used to have these words in every job related ad. But then we asked ourselves, aren’t we all able to do that?

In fact we are. Even if you prefer to work independently everyone is able to work in a team environment and vice-versa. Actually most jobs have a combination of both environments. If you are applying for a freelancing position for example, we are going to assume you like to work independently. And if we are talking about an offer for joining a specific team, you have to be able to work in that team environment. But you’ll also have to be able to work independently. There is no such thing as a 100% job working in a team environment.

We wrote this article to tell you about the vices of the HR world. We are so used to the bla bla bla world that sometimes we write things without question the obvious. Recently most jobs offers I looked at are searching for people (or should we say super-heros) with:

Communication skills (It’s so overrated that it has no meaning at all. Evaluate this in an interview, so don’t bother write it on your resume or select someone who is able to write that)

Able to work in a team environment but also work independently (Guess what?! You just shorted down your list from 100% to 99%!)

– It’s an internship but you have to have 2 years of experience (Companies are looking for the impossible. They want the best for the smallest price. In the long term it’s not sustainable and you’ll not attract the best people with that kind of offer.)

Graduates with knowledge in a specific software (Are you aware of most universities’ study program? They are vague and not that much focused on the practical side of the work environment. Instead of looking for someone with that specific knowledge, choose someone who fits the company and position and invest one week to train that person.)

And the list can go on….Now we want to hear from you:

Recruiters: Do you agree? How do you define your job offers’ requirements?

Job Hunters: How many of these do you find and what do you think about them?

 

http://www.impressiveresumes.net