6 tips on how to attract recruiters to your LinkedIn Profile

For most people looking for a new job involves a long process built by daily actions. Those tasks include sending your resume, looking for job offers, replying to emails, calling some companies and creating specific profiles in social networks. The most famous one in these terms is LinkedIn.

optimize-a-linkedIn-Profile

Everyone looking for a job should consider to build a LinkedIn Profile or update the existing one. Read the following tips on how to improve your chances to attract recruiters.

1. Find a keywords strategyHave you ever heard of SEO (Search Engine Optimization)? Companies are using it to improve their status when someone looks for a specific word on a search engine like Google. The same happens on LinkedIn and even on Google, regarding searching for employees. Make a list of the keywords associated to your academic background and professional experience. Than ask yourself: How would someone look for a profile like mine? Try to adapt your words from that perspective.

Tip: instead of writing Digital Strategy, you should write Digital Strategist. And what if they look for Online Strategy? Consider to include synonyms for your keywords, so you can broader your chances.

2. Prepare your best pictureWe all know you shouldn’t have a picture on your resume, but on LinkedIn it’s a different story. You will increase 7 times more your chances of getting your profile viewed just by having a picture on it. A face gives credibility and creates an impact. It also shows that you are active on LinkedIn. You should obviously choose wisely what kind of photo to put there. Make sure you are in a professional environment.

Tip: Don’t put a picture with a dog unless you are a veterinary.

3. Use your nameYou should personalize your URL and making it go directly to your profile. If you do this you will increase your chances to appear in a Google search.

Tip: You can also include a keyword in your URL like http://www.linkedin.com /in/CarlySimonSinger

4. Collect RecommendationsRequest people who already worked with you or for you to recommend you. Try to look for different people to point out a variety of skills you have. It gives credibility and shows your networking skills.

Tip: You should also make good recommendations as they will also appear on your profile.

5. Strategic ConnectionsAs you increase your connections you’ll increase the chances to appear on the recruiters’ search. Identify people you want to establish a connection with and write a personalized message in each request.

Tip: You can talk about the fact you are looking for a job, but don’t do it in the first message.

6. Share, be activeSome people think they just need to create a profile, add some people and magic will happen. Things don’t work that way, you cannot just make a profile and expect for a job to knock at your door. You need to actively participate and engage on LinkedIn activities. You can join some groups, share some interesting content or comment on others in order to make your profile more visible.If you need some help, we know how to create an impressive LinkedIn profile:

www.impressiveresumes.net

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What part of your resume is being read by recruiters?

A recent study from The Ladders shows how is the recruiter’s behavior when it comes to resume screening and evaluation. According to the study, recruiters waste an average of 6 seconds to the first screening of resumes. So you have 6 seconds to convince them why you should go to the next phase.

An “eye tracking” scientific technique was used in 30 recruiters for a period of 10 weeks, examining the ocular movements while evaluating several resumes. After that they were able to identify what parts of resumes are more looked at and for how long.

These are what recruiters spend more time looking at:

  • Name
  • Positions/Roles
  • Companies
  • Dates
  • Education

Here you have 2 examples of different resumes and their differences are clear.

impressive resumes

The one in the right was more looked at because it’s easier to read and it has a structure.

Make sure your resume is readable and that you highlight the names and positions you held in the past or you are looking for in the future. Make your resume stand out, or ask us for a little help at www.impressiveresumes.net.

How stupid and unreal do you find most job offers?

Perfection

Looking for an employee able to work in a team and work independently?

It is not unusual to find these kind of requirements in a job offer, but what is the real meaning behind them?

We were looking for some job offers and we found this one asking for someone to be able to work in a team environment and work independently. At first we didn’t pay much attention because we are so used to have these words in every job related ad. But then we asked ourselves, aren’t we all able to do that?

In fact we are. Even if you prefer to work independently everyone is able to work in a team environment and vice-versa. Actually most jobs have a combination of both environments. If you are applying for a freelancing position for example, we are going to assume you like to work independently. And if we are talking about an offer for joining a specific team, you have to be able to work in that team environment. But you’ll also have to be able to work independently. There is no such thing as a 100% job working in a team environment.

We wrote this article to tell you about the vices of the HR world. We are so used to the bla bla bla world that sometimes we write things without question the obvious. Recently most jobs offers I looked at are searching for people (or should we say super-heros) with:

Communication skills (It’s so overrated that it has no meaning at all. Evaluate this in an interview, so don’t bother write it on your resume or select someone who is able to write that)

Able to work in a team environment but also work independently (Guess what?! You just shorted down your list from 100% to 99%!)

– It’s an internship but you have to have 2 years of experience (Companies are looking for the impossible. They want the best for the smallest price. In the long term it’s not sustainable and you’ll not attract the best people with that kind of offer.)

Graduates with knowledge in a specific software (Are you aware of most universities’ study program? They are vague and not that much focused on the practical side of the work environment. Instead of looking for someone with that specific knowledge, choose someone who fits the company and position and invest one week to train that person.)

And the list can go on….Now we want to hear from you:

Recruiters: Do you agree? How do you define your job offers’ requirements?

Job Hunters: How many of these do you find and what do you think about them?

 

http://www.impressiveresumes.net